I am an experienced public speaker and have given talks at meetups in London, UK and California, USA. I have also spoken at tech conferences in the UK and Berlin, Germany.

I am able to create, deliver and amend my talks to suit different formats, for example lightning talks (5-10 minutes) and long talks (25-35 minutes).

I am currently designing and delivering coding workshops. Again, I am able to work in different formats, including 75-minute after-work sessions and half-day classes. All the classes I teach are hands-on.

The workshops I have delivered are all bespoke for each client and the participants have ranged from code newbie, to lapsed coder, to experienced developer.

My talks and workshops are listed below. Where available, I have linked to video or audio recordings.

Please get in touch with me if you would like to discuss your requirements.


Ladies Of Code London: Get Into... Series

June 2020 | Webinar recorded in London, United Kingdom

Get into... Product Management

I am a Chapter Lead at Ladies Of Code London. When COVID-19 reached the UK and forced us 100% online, I looked at ways to innovate our offerings. This led to me devising an interview format for our Get Into… series.

Get Into… is where we demystify roles in the tech industry. LoC events cater for those who are already in tech and want to level up and/or switch tracks as well as those who are new to the industry. People are always keen to hear from those who have gone before them.

I chose an interview format to make it more interesting for online viewers and reduce the lead time by removing the labour from the interviewee: all they have to do is turn up on the night. You can read about my methodology in my blog post .

I source the interviewees, write all my own questions and include two speed rounds to vary the pace and keep viewers engaged.

The interviews are conducted on Zoom in front of a live audience who can send their questions in via the chat function. I select some of these questions to weave into the interview.

For Get Into… Product Management, I approached Head of Consumer Product at Gousto, Melanie McKay, because she has worked in Product Management at a variety of organisations in the public and private sectors over the past 15 years. She now leads product management at the UK’s largest real estate and property website.

Topics we covered included:

  • How to get into technical product management from outside the tech industry
  • The tools that product managers use
  • Common misconceptions about product management
  • What Melanie’s second-favourite website is…

We record the interviews and post them on YouTube after the event. You can watch Get Into… Product Management below:



Ladies Of Code London: Get Into... Series

May 2020 | Webinar recorded in London, United Kingdom

Get into... Engineering Management

I am a Chapter Lead at Ladies Of Code London. When COVID-19 reached the UK and forced us 100% online, I looked at ways to innovate our offerings. This led to me devising an interview format for our Get Into… series.

Get Into… is where we demystify roles in the tech industry. LoC events cater for those who are already in tech and want to level up and/or switch tracks as well as those who are new to the industry. People are always keen to hear from those who have gone before them.

I chose an interview format to make it more interesting for online viewers and reduce the lead time by removing the labour from the interviewee: all they have to do is turn up on the night. You can read about my methodology in my blog post .

I source the interviewees, write all my own questions and include two speed rounds to vary the pace and keep viewers engaged.

The interviews are conducted on Zoom in front of a live audience who can send their questions in via the chat function. I select some of these questions to weave into the interview.

For Get Into… Engineering Management, I approached Software Engineering Manager at Gousto, Amy Phillips, because she has held a number of tech management roles across various organisations and was well-placed to give us some views about what it takes to be an engineering manager.

Topics we covered included:

  • Different flavours of engineering management
  • Who your main working relationships are with as an engineering manager
  • Where you can go from engineering management if you want to progress further
  • Whether or not Marmite should be allowed in the house…

We record the interviews and post them on YouTube after the event. You can watch Get Into… Engineering Management below:



Ladies Of Code London: Get Into... Series

April 2020 | Webinar recorded in London, United Kingdom

Get into... Web Development

I am a Chapter Lead at Ladies Of Code London. When COVID-19 reached the UK and forced us 100% online, I looked at ways to innovate our offerings. This led to me devising an interview format for our Get Into… series.

Get Into… is where we demystify roles in the tech industry. LoC events cater for those who are already in tech and want to level up and/or switch tracks as well as those who are new to the industry. People are always keen to hear from those who have gone before them.

I chose an interview format to make it more interesting for online viewers and reduce the lead time by removing the labour from the interviewee: all they have to do is turn up on the night. You can read about my methodology in my blog post .

I source the interviewees, write all my own questions and include two speed rounds to vary the pace and keep viewers engaged.

The interviews are conducted on Zoom in front of a live audience who can send their questions in via the chat function. I select some of these questions to weave into the interview.

For Get Into… Web Development, I approached Niamh because she had an unusual story: she taught herself. I wanted to highlight this as a viable route to paid coding work which may be an option for those who can’t access bootcamps or similar courses.

Topics we covered included:

  • How Niamh taught herself to code alongside a full-time job
  • Moving from learning to code to getting paid to code
  • Workplace mentoring and support
  • Which were better: Boyzone or Westlife…

We record the interviews and post them on YouTube after the event. You can watch Get Into… Web Development below:



FACT///.Coding Workshop Series With Suze Shardlow

March 2020 | University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

FACT///.Coding Workshop Series With Suze Shardlow

Following the talk I gave at their Symposium in November 2019, the lecturers at the University of Sussex invited me to create and deliver a series of three half-day coding workshops for them.

The workshop participants are Professors, PhDs and PhD candidates who have no coding experience, or are very rusty.

The brief was to:

  • Teach the basics of JavaScript and Python
  • Guide participants through using those languages in a practical way to create something interactive and relevant to the participants’ work

After bouncing some ideas off the client, I suggested we build a chatbot as the end product of the workshop series. The client has some data gathered during a project 30+ years ago which we are making accessible via the chatbot.

All the workshops are hands-on.

Workshop One (in early February 2020) focuses on the basics of JavaScript and Python.

Workshop Two (in late February 2020) focuses on building the bot in stages, gradually introducing intelligence.

Workshop Three (this one) concludes the build of the chatbot, increases the AI and brings in the original data from 1988 so we can chat with the subjects of the study.

Professor Rachel Thomson of the University of Sussex, who conducted the original research, has written a blog post about Workshop One.


FACT///.Coding Workshop Series With Suze Shardlow

February 2020 | University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

FACT///.Coding Workshop Series With Suze Shardlow

Following the talk I gave at their Symposium in November 2019, the lecturers at the University of Sussex invited me to create and deliver a series of three half-day coding workshops for them.

The workshop participants are Professors, PhDs and PhD candidates who have no coding experience, or are very rusty.

The brief was to:

  • Teach the basics of JavaScript and Python
  • Guide participants through using those languages in a practical way to create something interactive and relevant to the participants’ work

After bouncing some ideas off the client, I suggested we build a chatbot as the end product of the workshop series. The client has some data gathered during a project 30+ years ago which we are making accessible via the chatbot.

All the workshops are hands-on.

Workshop One (in early February 2020) focuses on the basics of JavaScript and Python.

Workshop Two (this one) focuses on building the bot in stages, gradually introducing intelligence

Workshop Three (in March 2020) concludes the build of the chatbot, increases the AI and brings in the original data from 1988 so we can chat with the subjects of the study.

Professor Rachel Thomson of the University of Sussex, who conducted the original research, has written a blog post about Workshop One.


codebar monthlies

February 2020 | FutureGov, London, United Kingdom

Tech Conferences For The Uninitiated

codebar monthlies are for developers with 0-6 months’ coding experience.

After my talk on Hackathons For The Uninitiated in October 2019, codebar asked me to return in Q1 2020 to deliver a talk based on my blog post on Tech Conferences For The Uninitiated.

In April 2019 I attended my first tech conference as a software engineer and, by the end of the year, had attended more than 15 conferences and spoken at two of them.

In this talk, I advise on:

  • Deciding why to attend
  • Finding your tribe
  • Finding your level
  • Getting your ticket
  • Connecting with people beforehand
  • Figuring out your schedule
  • Deciding what to bring
  • Finding your space
  • Managing your expectations
  • Networking: approaching people you don’t know
  • Networking: keeping in touch

FACT///.Coding Workshop Series With Suze Shardlow

February 2020 | University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

FACT///.Coding Workshop Series With Suze Shardlow

Following the talk I gave at their Symposium in November 2019, the lecturers at the University of Sussex invited me to create and deliver a series of three half-day coding workshops for them.

The workshop participants are Professors, PhDs and PhD candidates who have no coding experience, or are very rusty.

The brief was to:

  • Teach the basics of JavaScript and Python
  • Guide participants through using those languages in a practical way to create something interactive and relevant to the participants’ work

After bouncing some ideas off the client, I suggested we build a chatbot as the end product of the workshop series. The client has some data gathered during a project 30+ years ago which we are making accessible via the chatbot.

All the workshops are hands-on.

Workshop One (this one) focuses on the basics of JavaScript and Python.

Workshop Two (in late February 2020) focuses on building the bot in stages, gradually introducing intelligence.

Workshop Three (in March 2020) concludes the build of the chatbot, increases the AI and brings in the original data from 1988 so we can chat with the subjects of the study.

Professor Rachel Thomson of the University of Sussex, who conducted the original research, has written a blog post about Workshop One.


Fundamental JS

January 2020 | American Addiction Centers, San Diego, California, USA

Hackathons For The Uninitiated

Fundamental JS is part of the San Diego JS family of meetups. It is a monthly event which focuses on “vanilla” JavaScript: no frameworks or libraries allowed! Each month they have one code talk and one people skills talk.

This is a repeat of the talk I gave at codebar monthlies in October 2019, with updated slides and the content customised for an American audience.

Hackathons are for everyone in tech. They a great way to meet others in the industry and hone your collaboration skills.

In this talk, I describe:

  • What a hackathon is
  • Different hackathon formats
  • What it’s like to take part
  • How to find others to work with
  • What non-coding skills you can bring
  • How I entered and won my first hackathon
  • How you can find hackathons to enter

Interestingly, the straw poll I took at this talk gave similar results to the one in London. It showed that a fifth of the audience knew what a hackathon was and didn’t think it was for them, however, by the end of my talk they were all keen to try one.


Women Who Code San Diego

January 2020 | Hera Hub, San Diego, California, USA

Build Your Personal Website And Blog with GitHub Pages and Jekyll

I am a Director of Women Who Code (WWCode) London and, as soon as I knew I would be holidaying in San Diego, I reached out to my WWCode counterparts there to offer to run a workshop for them.

January is a popular time to try new things and make changes in one’s life and career, so I decided to create a workshop to teach people how to create their own personal branding and portfolio website using GitHub Pages and Jekyll.

This hands-on workshop is aimed at experienced coders (of any language) who are familiar with common programming concepts like variables, objects, loops and IF statements. It is not suitable for code newbies.

I equip participants with prepared website templates and the skills to add layouts and content to their site using DRY principles. They can add as many blog posts and projects as they like, which will be neatly rendered in a grid on a flexible template.

I also created a student handbook which they are free to use and refer to in their own time. Some students have shared this with friends and colleagues.

As you can see from the photo, I had a full house of 40 students for this workshop. Three of the participants reached out to me within 48 hours of the session to let me know they had published blog posts on their new sites.

Testimonials:

“Suze led the “Building Your Portfolio with Jekyll” workshop offered through Women Who Code in San Diego, California. I was really excited for the opportunity to listen and learn anything code related from someone from another country, and Suze is from the UK. The entire process was really rewarding. The event was communicated well in advance, and after I signed up, Suze reached out same day via email to add me to the group’s Slack channel. She sent us prerequisites for what we should already know and notes ahead of her presentation. The actual presentation was well organized, quick paced (under 2 hours), with pauses to explain syntax using Jekyll, and included recommendations on how to utilize Jekyll to promote dry code. As a growing developer, I was excited to take part in a workshop where we built a new project from start to finish and had the site live and up and running by the end. I definitely hope to see Suze for another workshop! Thank you!” -Workshop Participant

“Suze Shardlow is an amazing instructor. Her passion for technology and experience as a Full Stack Engineer is invaluable in her role as Director of Women Who Code London. Suze created and led an awesome workshop on how to Build Your Personal Website And Blog With GitHub Pages and Jekyll. I was fortunate to attend her workshop during her travels to the US, at a recent local WWCode chapter meetup. She skillfully curated the content and supplemental materials in such a way that allowed for maximum comprehension and successful results within a limited hour long time frame. The technical skills I obtained from the workshop facilitated by Suze were easily applied to a subsequent project, and the materials provided have been a great resource in the planning of my own personal professional blog.” -Workshop Participant

“Suze hosted a really practical and well structured workshop for Women Who Code San Diego focused on teaching how to create a personal dev blog from GitHub. Even if attendees had different background and experience, they were all able to easily follow the workshop and have a live blog at the end of the event. Suze is an exceptional teacher, engaged on helping everyone succeed before, during, and after the workshop. I hope she can host the workshop for us again given the large interest received.” -Event Organiser


FACT///.Mapping Feminists Coding Practices Symposium

November 2019 | University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom

Working Towards More Inclusive Tech Communities

I was invited by the University of Sussex to speak on the subject of inclusion in tech communities at their coding conference.

The audience was Professors, PhDs and PhD candidates from the University of Sussex and other institutions in the CHASE Network.

In this long talk, I cover:

  • Communities in tech and why we need them
  • Privilege: does inclusion mean exclusion?
  • “Safe” and “brave” spaces
  • Language: why things like “hi guys!” aren’t unisex

When you enter the tech industry, you soon realise that meetups are a Thing. Groups gather every night of the week in every major city in the world and share IT ideas and knowledge over pizza and beers.

Statistics, by their very nature, vary - but, by any measure, tech is dominated by white men and has been for decades. There are, however, thousands of women, people of colour and other minorities in the industry. And there are countless community groups catering to their needs.

But by being inclusive, are these groups actually exclusive? Have you ever seen an event advertised and thought it looked great but then realised that you’re not the target market for the group? How did this make you feel? Happy that the marginalised community in question had a safe space, or slighted and wondering how they’d like it if you had a club just for people like you?

Would you agree that, mostly, people just want to be themselves? Have you ever experienced a time where you felt you couldn’t?

You can listen to the audio recording of this talk below. The recording starts with an introduction by Professor Kate O’Riordan, Head of School for Media, Film and Music at the University of Sussex and my talk begins at four minutes in.


codebar monthlies

October 2019 | Ticketmaster HQ, London, United Kingdom

Hackathons For The Uninitiated

codebar monthlies are for developers with 0-6 months’ coding experience.

Hackathons are for everyone in tech. They a great way to meet others in the industry and hone your collaboration skills.

In this talk, I describe:

  • What a hackathon is
  • Different hackathon formats
  • What it’s like to take part
  • How to find others to work with
  • What non-coding skills you can bring
  • How I entered and won my first hackathon
  • How you can find hackathons to enter

A straw poll at this talk showed that a fifth of the audience knew what a hackathon was and didn’t think it was for them, however, by the end of my talk they were all keen to try one.


Women Who Code Front End Summit

October 2019 | BCG Digital Ventures, Berlin, Germany

From Policing To Programming: How I Changed Career When I Turned 40

This is a long version of my first tech talk, the original lightning version of which has had over 6400 views on YouTube. You can watch the lightning version below.

People had come to this conference from all over the world, so I adapted the content and terminology for an international audience. I also went into more detail in the section on the bootcamp experience.

I first started coding when I was seven years old. I became a software engineer as an adult following long careers in marketing and policing and surviving three redundancies.

Here I talk about:

  • How I decided I wanted to be a coder
  • How I made the leap
  • What I learned along the way



Greater Than 11% Podcast, Episode 41

June 2019 | Hub TV, London, United Kingdom

Podcast - Suze Shardlow - Coder

I did my first tech talk as a software engineer back in April 2019, about how I switched careers. Renée Vaughan Sutherland, Chief Creative Officer at a TV company, saw the video and contacted me to ask if I would guest on her podcast!

She was interviewing women in creative roles and counted coding as one of them. I accepted the invitation straightaway and, a few weeks later, went to record the podcast with her.

We talk coding, crafting and creativity: what I love about them and how they’re all linked.

Have a listen here.


COED:CODE Lightning Talks Event: New Speaker Talent Showcase

April 2019 | Pivotal Europe, London, United Kingdom

From Policing To Programming: How I Changed Career When I Turned 40

This was my first tech talk, which has had over 6400 views on YouTube. You can watch it below.

I first started coding when I was seven years old. I became a software engineer as an adult following long careers in marketing and policing and surviving three redundancies.

Here I talk about:

  • How I decided I wanted to be a coder
  • How I made the leap
  • What I learned along the way



Women Driven Development Hackathon

March 2019 | Expedia UK, London, United Kingdom

Hackathon Vlog Interview

I’ve attended a few hackathons in the past five years; I won the first one.

In this interview I talk about my journey from coding as a child to becoming a software engineer as an adult. I also talk about why anyone can succeed at a hackathon.

This vlog interview turned out to be a precursor to my talk “Hackathons For The Uninitiated”, which I have given in London, UK and California, USA.

You can watch the interview below.